A Greener Tomorrow

A Greener Tomorrow 2016

RE-LAUNCHING 'A GREENER TOMORROW'

Our latest initiative

Following the overwhelming response received for the initiative in its first year (2013), Emirates decided to re-launch 'A Greener Tomorrow' in 2016.

As part of the 2016 campaign, Emirates selected three not-for-profit organisations working in wildlife protection and environmental conservation in Africa as recipients of a funding award.

The winners, Southern African Wildlife College Trust, Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds, and African Parks, were selected from a global pool of applicants working towards environmental sustainability and conservation in their respective regions.

At Emirates we want to inspire people to explore the beauty of our world.

INSPIRE

We know it's important to look after our planet today so that tomorrow's global travelers can enjoy it too.

PROTECT

We have a responsibility towards the communities we fly to, and we know we can make a real impact.

RESPONSIBILITY

That's why in 2013 we launched our environmental initiative called A Greener Tomorrow. 2013

A GREENER TOMORROW

Our mission, to support sustainable, environmental and conservation projects around the world.

MISSION, PROJECTS

It was such a great success that we decided to do it all again in 2016.

SUCCESS, 2013. 2016

We're calling it, "A Greener Tomorrow Two".

A GREENER TOMORROW TWO

We laid down a challenge to conservation and environmental organizations.

CHALLENGE

We asked them to submit a project proposal that would have a real impact on their local environment.

PROPOS@L

It had to be something that connected with our values, giving back to the local community.

GIVING BACK, COMMUNITY.

In return, they could receive a share of $150,000 to fund their project.

The funds were collected from the many recycling programs within the Emirates Group.[music playing]

Over 120 applications came flooding in from countries across our network, many of which were focused on the protection of wildlife. Our committee of senior executives and members of our environment team chose three amazing projects to share the award, ones that align with the UN's sustainable development goals and show a long-term solution to environmental and conservation issues. [music playing]

GOAL, ISSUES.

We believe education is key to change and progress.

EDUCATION

That's why we chose to support the Southern African Wildlife College Trust. [African singing]

SOUTHERN AFRICAN WILDLIFE COLLEGE TRUST

Biodiversity in Africa has to start with myself. Africans should be the first to take a stance in wildlife management. They need to go to the other side.

ARMSTRONG CHINGA, ZAMBIA

For me, to come here on my own, it is something that I can't even imagine. But I just thank God that the people that are there helping us and the ones that sponsored me to come and study here, really did a good thing, because they have educated the whole nation.

GRACE NAMUKONDE LENGWE, ZAMBIA

I'm going to take this knowledge, and I will use it there, back to my country.

There are so many things that we are learning, and not only writing them on the books, but also doing them on the ground, practical. [music playing]

The opportunity to study at Southern African Wildlife College is really valued. We go every year to visit the guys on the ground at their workplaces and we see just how much of a difference this has made in the lives of people.

MALCOLM DOUGLAS, SAWC, WILDLIFE AREA MANAGEMENT QUALIFICATIONS

I think for us, one of the greatest success stories is the fact that about 80% of the students going through the college remain in the employment of conservation organizations and are being promoted within three years of actually receiving the training.

THERESA SOWRY, CEO SAWC

What we're really hoping for is to create a nice network environment of conservators who all have the Southern African Wildlife College as a common ground, and that they can then start cooperating and working even across boundaries, particularly in trans frontier conservation areas.

Every year the Southern African Wildlife College Trust awards a number of scholarships for academic excellence, as well as bursaries to our wildlife area management students. If it wasn't for donors, such as Emirates, A Greener Tomorrow Initiative, this trust would not continue to grow. If it continues to grow, more and more scholarships get awarded to conservation students.

We have come to learn a lot of different things from different countries. We are learning different cultures of our friends. We exchange a lot of ideas, what they do in their country, we take it to Zambia as well. And they also learn something from us and take it to their country.

When you select people from the stakeholder communities which are right adjacent to these wildlife areas, you start to get a buy-in that is much more sustainable.

Not only does that student learn about conservation venues and ethics, but they also have such a positive impact in their community, in wildlife conservation, in anti-poaching, in the whole wildlife economy, and understanding the value of wildlife and keeping it alive for them and their future within their communities.

When I go home I'll be a very different person. I will be able to involve the community in the everyday dealings of conservation. I want to work with them to see that we need to work together as a group to conserve our natural resources.

My dream and goal for the future is to go back to Zimbabwe with the skills and knowledge acquired from this college, and be a leader with results on the ground, so that people all over the world will see what this college does.

RICHARD MAHLANGU, ZIMBABWE

I will inspire my colleagues who are there, the same way I was inspired by those who came here before me. [music playing]

We turned our attention from the land to the sea and chose to award the Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds. [piano music]

SANCCOB, SOUTHERN AFRICAN FOUNDATION FOR THE CONVERSATION OF COASTAL BIRDS

So SANCCOB is the Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds. We were established in 1968 by a lady called Althea Westphal.

SANCCOB's mission is to reverse the decline of the African penguin and conserve all seabirds for our future generations. What we do here is to rescue, rehabilitate and release these birds back into the ocean so they have another chance at life.

NICKY STANDER, REHABILITATION MANAGER

Particularly the African penguin is in serious decline. There's less than 25,000 left in the wild.

So SANCCOB sees about 2.5 thousand seabirds every year at both of its centers.

FRANCOIS LOUW, FUNDRAISING/MARKETING MANAGER

We are a non-government organization. We see 150 volunteers and interns every year to do as much as possible to try and save Southern Africa's seabirds.

So day-to-day activities for volunteers would be we start at 8:00 with a morning meeting.

MARGUERITE DU PREEZ, VOLUNTEER CO-ORDINATOR

Straight after the morning meeting you'll go to the designated area you'll be in for the day. If we look at a penguin pen, then the people will start with their morning medication and give them fluids, then the birds will have a swim. While the birds are swimming we'll do all the cleaning necessary in the enclosure. After that we'll give the birds their first feed for the day.

They need to be fed six times a day, so that's every three hours. The little one cagey chick is taking down 9 fish in one day, so it's intense.

ROMY KLUSENER, CHICK REARING UNIT SUPERVISOR

We can in chick season use about 800 to a ton of fish a week.

Obviously the work that we do needs financial assistance, and certainly Emirates A Greener Tomorrow award is hugely beneficial. We're able to use that money to help the colony staff assist with stabilization kits and train our staff to give the best possible care to the birds. So we do releases every week here. Every Thursday we release African penguins.

Going on a release is a wonderful experience. It's a culmination of all the hard work that you see here every day.

I think what makes it so special for me, most often one of the first things that the chicks do with all the blue is they look up to the sky. They've never seen this big, open blue sky above them, you know, they're under shade netting. It's really nothing like it, you know, it's so special.

We set out to make the bird better and then put it back in its natural environment. It really fills my heart with joy when I can just put that bird back in the ocean. I certainly want my children to be able to grow up alongside these birds, so it's extremely important that we conserve them, and that we all work together to address the threats facing the African penguin. [music playing]

Another education project took our interest for its reach. African Parks is a not-for profit organization that manages ten parks in seven African countries. [music playing]

AFRICAN PARKS

Where wildlife survives and thrives, there's the opportunity for people to do so as well.

African Parks is unique in that we take on the direct responsibility for the long term management of national parks.

PETER FEARNHEAD, CEO AFRICAN PARKS

We are the boots on the ground. We engage with local communities who are our key partners.

To achieve conservation development, we have to work with the community.

NYAMBE MWAMBWA, LIUWA PLAIN COMMUNITY MANAGER

So it becomes their property.

INDUNA MUNDANDWE, BAROTSE ROYAL ESTABLISHMENT CHIEF

We work with local communities to ensure the sustainability of the use of their natural resources. [music playing]

Liuwa is a unique national park in that there are 10,000 local Liuwasi people who are the ultimate custodians of the park. And these are people who are totally dependent on the provisioning of the system.

For us to achieve our long-term goal of securing this landscape for the next generation, we have to rely on education. [music playing]

ROBERT REID, PARK MANAGER, LIUWA PLAIN

We have to educate children, because in 15 years' time they're going to be adults making decisions, which is why we are educating kids in the schools, in the park with our environmental educational programs. [music playing]

The reality is that the education out in the park is really poor, so we've offered students a chance to come to school here in Kalabo, fully paid by African Parks.

They are not only paying for my school fees, but they are also responsible for things like groceries. So I couldn't have managed without their help. [music playing]

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT, LIUWA PLAIN DISTRICT

We have a lot of activities that African Parks is offering to the school.

DOMINIC HALEKAE, SENIOR TEACHER, LIUWA PLAIN DISTRICT

We aim to use the Emirates funding to invest into education, to diversify their opportunities going forward.

ANDREW PARKER, OPERATIONS DIRECTOR, AFRICAN PARKS

The ZEduPad is a uniquely Zambian initiative. It's a tablet computer onto which the entire Zambian curriculum is loaded in nine local languages plus English, and then made available to children as a technological aid in terms of their education, where they're able to access information that was otherwise not readily available to them.

They're encouraging us to work hard so that we become better in life.

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT, LIUWA PLAIN DISTRICT

My ambition is to be a teacher when I complete my education.

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT, LIUWA PLAIN DISTRICT

They're going to achieve their dreams at the end of the day.

It's a legacy that we hope to leave for our children, to save what is essentially not just Zambia's, but it is the world's.

The future. When our children, our grand grandchildren will come and see this wildlife. [music playing]

We're excited to see how A Greener Tomorrow Two will help these organizations in their drive for sustainable biodiversity, conservation and community development.

EXCITED, BIODIVERSITY, CONSERVATION, COMMUNITY

You can find out more about all of the organizations and the outstanding work they do on their websites.

Together, we're creating a greener tomorrow, starting today.

A GREENER TOMORROW, STARTING TODAY

NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION

Southern African Wildlife College Trust

The Southern African Wildlife College was established in 1996 by the World Wide Fund for Nature, South Africa (WWF South Africa) in close cooperation with national and provincial government departments, and the Southern African Development Community (SADC). Since its start in 1996 the College has trained close on 15,000 students from 46 countries in natural resource management and conservation practices. Through funding from Emirates’ ‘A Greener Tomorrow’ initiative, SAWCT - a Trust set up by WWF SA in support of the College - will provide three scholarships and two bursaries for their certificate programmes in nature conservation to students who already work in the conservation area but who do not have formal education to advance their careers. These qualifications will help students move into roles such as wildlife area managers, park rangers and senior field rangers, working to protect wildlife parks within southern Africa.

For more information about SAWCT please visit: wildlifecollege.org.za(Opens an external website in a new tab)

[African singing] 

[Pink sun rises through the trees ] 

Biodiversity in Africa has to start with myself. Africans should be the first to take a stance in wildlife management. They need to go to the other side. For me, to come here on my own, it is something that I can't even imagine. But I just thank God that the people that are there helping us and the ones that sponsored me to come and study here, really did a good thing, because they have educated the whole nation. I'm going to take this knowledge and I will use it there, back to my country. There are so many things that we are learning, and not only writing them on the books, but also doing them on the ground, practical.

[Music] [Southern African wildlife college building] The opportunity to study at Southern African Wildlife College is really valued. We go every year to visit the guys on the ground at their workplaces and we see just how much of a difference this has made in the lives of people. I think for us, one of the greatest success stories is the fact that about 80% of the students going through the college remain in the employment of conservation organizations and are being promoted within three years of actually receiving the training. What we’re really hoping for is to create a nice network environment of conservators who all have the Southern African Wildlife College as a common ground, and that they can then start cooperating and working even across boundaries, particularly in trans frontier conservation areas. Every year the Southern African Wildlife College Trust awards a number of scholarships for academic excellence, as well as bursaries to our wildlife area management students. If it wasn't for donors, such as Emirates, A Greener Tomorrow Initiative, this trust would not continue to grow. If it continues to grow, more and more scholarships get awarded to conservation students.

We have come to learn a lot of different things from different countries. We are learning different cultures of our friends. We exchange a lot of ideas, what they do in their country, we take it to Zambia as well. And they also learn something from us and take it to their country. When you select people from the stakeholder communities which are right adjacent to these wildlife areas, you start to get a buy-in that is much more sustainable. Not only does that student learn about conservation venues and ethics, but they also have such a positive impact in their community, in wildlife conservation, in anti-poaching, in the whole wildlife economy, and understanding the value of wildlife and keeping it alive for them and their future within their communities.

When I go home I'll be a very different person. I will be able to involve the community in the everyday dealings of conservation. I want to work with them to see that we need to work together as a group to conserve our natural resources. My dream and goal for the future is to go back to Zimbabwe with the skills and knowledge acquired from this college, and be a leader with results on the ground, so that people all over the world will see what this college does. I will inspire my colleagues who are there, the same way I was inspired by those who came here before me. [Music]

PROTECTION, TREATING AND CONSERVING

Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds

SANNCOB is a marine non-profit organisation and the mandated government rehabilitation authority in South Africa which protects, treats and conserves seabirds and threatened species such as the African penguin. It is recognised internationally as a leader in the field of seabird rehabilitation with veterinary staff working work around the clock, 365 days a year, to provide the best care to the ill, injured, abandoned and oiled African penguins and other vulnerable seabirds that are admitted to its two centres annually. Funding from ‘A Greener Tomorrow’ will go towards helping support SANNCOB’s rehabilitation, protection, research and breeding programmes.

For more information about SANCCOB please visit: sanccob.co.za/

[Music] [A group of penguins gather on a rocky beach. 

They groom themselves as the sun sets behind them.] 

So Sanccob is the Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds. We were established in 1968 by a lady called Althea Westphal. Sanccob's mission is to reverse the decline of the African penguin and conserve all seabirds for our future generations. What we do here is to rescue, rehabilitate and release these birds back into the ocean so they have another chance at life. Particularly the African penguin is in serious decline. There's less than 25,000 left in the wild. So Sanccob sees about two-and-a-half-thousand seabirds every year at both of its centers. We are non-government organization. We see 150 volunteers and interns every year to do as much as possible to try and save Southern Africa's seabirds. So day-to-day activities for volunteers would be we start at eight o'clock with a morning meeting. 

Straight after the morning meeting you'll go to the designated area you'll be in for the day. If we look at a penguin pen, then the people will start with their morning medication and give them fluids, then the birds will have a swim. While the birds are swimming we'll do all the cleaning necessary in the enclosure. After that we'll give the birds their first feed for the day. They need to be fed six times a day, so that's every three hours. The little one cagey chick is taking down 9 fish in one day, so it's intense. We can in chick season use about 800 to a ton of fish a week. Obviously the work that we do needs financial assistance, and certainly Emirates A Greener Tomorrow award is hugely beneficial. We're able to use that money to help the colony staff assist with stabilization kits and train our staff to give the best possible care to the birds. So we do releases every week here. 

Every Thursday we release African penguins. Going on a release is a wonderful experience. It's a culmination of all the hard work that you see here every day. I think what makes it so special for me, most often one of the first things that the chicks do with all the blue is they look up to the sky. They've never seen this big open blue sky above them, you know they're under shade netting. It's really nothing like it, you know, it's so special. We set out to make the bird better and then put it back in its natural environment. It really fills my heart with joy when I can just put that bird back in the ocean. 

I certainly want my children to be able to grow up alongside these birds, so it's extremely important that we conserve them, and that we all work together to address the threats facing the African penguin. [Music] [Many penguins on a sand beach. Some run toward the water. Others stand on land.]

SAVING WILDLIFE; RESTORING LANDSCAPES

African Parks

African Parks is a not-for-profit organisation established in 2000 that takes on the direct, long-term management of national parks and protected areas in partnership with governments in order to save wildlife, restore landscapes and ensure sustainable livelihoods for local communities. African Parks will use the funding from ‘A Greener Tomorrow’ to support educational development within the Barotse community who live within Liuwa Plain National Park in Zambia. African Parks will provide educational tablet computers and employ additional teaching assistants within the schools in the park. Improved access to education is expected to decrease the pressure on wildlife and natural resources of the park.

For more information about African Parks please visit: african-parks.org(Opens an external website in a new tab)

[Music] [The sun shines on a plain where a herd of buffalo runs] [A blue sky with morphing white clouds] Where wildlife survives and thrives, there's the opportunity for people to do so as well. [Three men stand in a river with fishing spears] African Parks is unique in that we take on the direct responsibility for the long-term management of national parks. [A strip of river banked by marsh] We are the boots on the ground. We engage with local communities who are our key partners. To achieve conservation development, we have to work with the community. So it becomes their property. We work with local communities to ensure the sustainability of the use of their natural resources. [Music] [Elephants in the sand, uniformed men on motor bikes in tall grass, bison in the field] Liuwa is a unique national park in that there are 10,000 local Liuwasi people who are the ultimate custodians of the park. And these are people who are totally dependent on the provisioning of the system. For us to achieve our long-term goal of securing this landscape for the next generation, we have to rely on education.

[Children in uniform raise their hands in a classroom] We have to educate children, because in 15 years' time they're going to be adults making decisions, which is why we are educating kids in the schools, in the park with our environmental educational programs. [Man points to blackboard, children sit in front] The reality is that the education out in the park is really poor, so we've offered students a chance to come to school here in Kalabo, fully paid by African Parks. [Classroom with computers] They are not only paying for my school fees, but they are also responsible for things like groceries. So I couldn't have managed without their help. [From above a simple village, kids run to a walled space, a man speaks to group of sitting children] We have a lot of activities that African Parks is offering to the school. [Small feet swing above ground]

We aim to use the Emirates funding to invest into education, to diversify their opportunities going forward. The ZEduPad is a uniquely Zambian initiative. It's a tablet computer onto which the entire Zambian curriculum is loaded in nine local languages plus English, and then made available to children as a technological aid in terms of their education, where they're able to access information that was otherwise not readily available to them. They're encouraging us to work hard so that we become better in life. My ambition is to be a teacher when I complete my education. They're going to achieve their dreams at the end of the day. [Smiling children] It's a legacy that we hope to leave for our children, to save what is essentially not just Zambia's, but it is the world. [Group of villagers] The future. When our children, our grand grand children will come and see this wildlife. [Music] [Buffalo run in the tall grass as the sun sets behind them]

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