A Greener Tomorrow

A Greener Tomorrow 2013

SUPPORTING OUR TOP THREE

Our first initiative

We called upon our passengers, employees, Facebook fans, universities and members of the general public to nominate eligible organisations, as well as encouraging environmental and conservation organisations to nominate themselves.

Over 400 nominations were submitted, from countries across the Emirates network and beyond. The applications spanned environmental initiatives such as animal, land and tree conservation, biogas, environmental research, awareness raising, and green transportation.

The quality of applications was so high that we couldn’t pick one winner; instead we decided to give funding awards to three organisations, supporting three separate projects.

LAST YEAR EMIRATES LAUNCHED “A GREENER TOMORROW” , AN ENVIRONMENTAL INITIATIVE WHICH SUPPORTS NOT-FOR-PROFIT ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS… THREE PROJECTS WON FUNDING FROM EMIRATES… A Greener Tomorrow is really an awareness-raising project. Awareness raising and education. We want to be able to support different organizations in their quest for environmental awareness, and to educate people on different environmental projects that are out there. As well as educating the people within the organizations that we sponsor. [Electronic jeepney] Here in Emirates we've been running internal recycling programs for about five years now. The money that's been raised through the recycling projects has always gone back into developing the projects further and other environmental initiatives across Emirates. But a couple of years ago we realized that we'd built up a surplus of money. So we wanted to be able to do something with it that would impact the wider community. So initially we put out a call for proposals and a call for nominations. So we had adverts on LinkedIn, National Geographic, some aviation websites, Facebook, and we also contacted universities and schools. And we asked the general public to nominate environmental charities that they knew of, and also environmental charities could nominate themselves.

We had well over a hundred eligible entries from all around the world, real variety of different types of initiatives, so it was really interesting to learn all about the different environmental issues that there are out there. The three projects we selected are in different locations. So we've got one in Malawi, in Africa, one in Pakistan, and one in Manila, in the Philippines. Manila was the first one that really jumped out at us because it's transport, and we thought there was some nice linkages between the aviation industry and what they were trying to do. So it's basically taking the iconic eJeepneys in Manila, and converting them to being electrical. MANILA: INSTITUTE FOR CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE CITIES [Music] [Man cleans ejeepney and hangs sign with fare information] [Colorful ejeepneys drive off] [Passengers hold on inside ejpeeney] The eJeepney, or the electric Jeepney, is the electric version of the Philippine iconic Jeepney, which is the most common form of public transportation in the Philippines. So the main difference is that instead of running in an engine, it has an electric motor, you charge it, and it doesn't emit any pollutants. We have a fleet of 20 eJeepneys right now, and they are running in Makati City and also in Quezon City. [Traffic sounds] [Horn beeps] [EJeepney on the road] Electric Jeepney has no noise, no smoke, better performance in noise pollution than the ordinary jeep.

Right now the jeeps operate in dedicated routes for electric public transport. So they're called the Makati Green routes and they're the first routes of their kind in the country. [eJeepney drives by, filled with people ] [Traffic sound] One of the main problems of a highly urbanized city like Makati is that they have a lot of private vehicles, so there's really a need to introduce and to improve on public transport. We recognize that by merely putting more electric vehicles on the road, we don't actually help in solving the traffic problem. Instead of putting a new electric vehicle on the road, we actually take an existing Jeepney and then we convert it into electric. The sad thing is that Jeepney drivers are about 50 percent or more susceptible to air pollution caused diseases, especially like respiratory diseases, because they are very vulnerable and they are exposed to air pollutants all day, every day. [Traffic noise] Driving a taxi, we load gasoline or diesel, whereas in the electric Jeepney we only use the electricity. [Horn beeps] We are creating information about the eJeepney.

Everything in the eJeepney we are telling to the passengers. They say, “Oh, that's great.” The passengers are nice and very cooperative. They like the electric vehicle because they don't hear noise, they don't inhale the black smoke. [Signs reads “100% no smoking” ] They like to ride electric Jeepney because somebody say it's cool, amazing, and they request that more eJeeps in Makati. We've seen that there's really now a momentum being built in introducing more electric vehicles on the roads, so we really hope that there will be more electric Jeepneys. And not just Jeepneys, but also electric buses, electric tricycles, and then even improving the whole transport system in the Philippines. [Traffic drives by] We are very proud of the electric Jeepneys being recognized all over the world. Electric Jeepneys have no noise, no gas, and it's environmental friendly, and this is a very special teaching.

[Music] [Ejeepney transport corp ] [A logo: the simple line drawing of a truck, a plug dangles from the back of the roof.] When we chose our finalists for Greener Tomorrow, the key things that we were looking for were that it raise environmental awareness levels, that it educate people, and how many people did it impact? And also would it be sustainable in the future? Because this is a one-time funding award and we wanted to make sure that the money would benefit people for future. The Malawi project, the funding that we're giving them, will be able to help the families, so it's raising awareness and it's touching the lives of many different people. MALAWI : RIPPLE AFRICA [African singing with drums] [Kids sit outside. Women walk down a road. A man and woman talk. A man sits on a tree stump with a boy. School children run. Three kids pump water.][Adults socialize. Another group of school children.] [Children singing] Changu Changu Moto. Changu Changu Moto means fast, fast fire. We called it in our vernacular language, Changu Changu Moto because most of the people whom we came across used to say it cooks fast. And in our own language here Changu Changu means fast fast. [Fire burns in stove made of mud bricks] After doing investigations in the local area, Ripple found that one of the biggest problems was deforestation. And one of the biggest contributors to that is cooking. About 95% of the population use wood for cooking. The Changu Changu Moto uses about a third or a quarter of the amount of wood that people use on the traditional three-stone fire. A three-stone fire, people use these big logs for cooking, and it is dirty in the kitchen. There is ash everywhere.

[Logs burn in a 3 stone fire] The charity found some stoves on the internet, and that it was mud bricks, for just a single stove. So from that, we did lots of testing, and we developed the stove so it evolved into a double stove cook stove. It's a lot safer, because the fire is enclosed, also produces less smoke, Smoke-related health issues is actually one of the bigger killers in Africa, not just here, but everywhere that you see traditional three-stone fires. Since most women in Malawi spend a lot of time doing their cooking on three-stone fire, and they had problems with coughs in children also. [Singing] [Forming of mud bricks] You'd see some pretty nasty burns, and you find quite a lot of children have had to go to medical centers because of burns from three-stone fires. We're operating within the whole district, the Nakata Bay district, which has just over 40,000 households. So we're going to build a Changu Changu Moto cook stove in every kitchen for those 40,000 households. We're currently up to about 30,000, so we're getting there, but we hope to, within the next four or five months, we hope to complete the whole district.

I would like to see each and every household continuing using the Changu Changu Motos. By so doing, we will save our trees. Saving a lot of wood is very beneficial to trying to slow down deforestation. We want to maintain the beauty of this country. It can be a big benefit for the women in the local area because they're the ones who collect the wood. There's a lot less smoke-related health problems. And really this project is about education. It's about changing the people's habits and get them used to using a new technology. By using a Changu Changu Moto we will totally conserve all our standing trees and it will keep our community green. [Drums] [Women shake hands over mud brick stove and smile] Emirates hopes that the donations to these organizations will educate people to live in a more environmentally friendly way by reducing the pollution through the environmentally friendly cook stoves that will be built, or by educating women on sustainable farming practices.

We hope that it will teach them plus future generations how to live in a more environmentally friendly way. And we also hope that by talking about these initiatives and through our Facebook sites or on our website that other people worldwide will learn more about these organizations. With Pakistan, it's a local village, and the main recipients will be women and children. There will also be a women's and children's education training center set up, so it'll help villagers in the future, and hopefully people in surrounding villages will be able to come and learn some environmental awareness techniques. PAKISTAN: HERITAGE FOUNDATION [Birds tweeting] [Children's voices] [Mule drawn carriages carry people and herbs down a dirt path , children play, women work in a tilled field.] [Water pump] The Heritage Foundation has been involved in humanitarian aid work since 2005. [Music] We have a seven village pilot program, and within those villages, we're trying to see where we can help the communities better their lives and also keeping into account that everything should be sustainable. [Village homes] The eco-toilet is a compostable toilet. We're trying to help these communities, by the construction of the eco-toilet, to battle these very big issues of the lack of washing hands, grooming, personal hygiene. We've constructed a couple of demos and the women are so happy because they have some place to go to. And it's close to their homes and stuff so they're not even ashamed. There's like the stigma of the bathroom that women are not supposed to use it. We're trying to break those barriers and help these women out. The cooking stoves are smokeless stoves, which means they're made completely out of earth. That means they're 100% biodegradable. The local traditional stove in Pakistan is an open fire, and it is the number one cause of respiratory and eye disease amongst women because of all the smoke that comes out.

[Woman lighting a mud stove] IT HAS THE ADVANTAGE THAT IN OUR ORDINARY STOVES THE SMOKE GETS INTO OUR EYES AND IT ALSO BURNS LESS WOOD. AND THE FOOD GETS PREPARED MORE EASILY AND THERE ARE TWO STOVES. SO YOU CAN MAKE CURRY ON ONE AND ROTI ON THE OTHER. [Woman stirs pot] We set up a mother's committee. These mothers made sure that all the children go to school in [PH 0:12:00] Moksharif. Now we have 100% attendance rate. And I mean what is better than that? THE ADVANTAGE OF EDUCATION IS THAT YOU CAN GET A JOB. YOU CAN BECOME A DOCTOR, A MASTER, AN OFFICER. I WANT TO BE A TEACHER. We also have a DRR program, so that's Disaster Risk Reduction. So you teach communities how to be prepared for disaster, and all the activities that we are doing with A Greener Tomorrow initiative are based on disaster preparedness activities. AT THE DRR CENTRE THEY TAUGHT US TO MAKE SURE WATER IS BOILED AND CLEAN, TO PLANT TREES AND SEND CHILDREN TO SCHOOL, TO MAINTAIN HYGIENE, AND TO MAKE SURE OF CHILDREN'S HYGIENE AND NUTRITION; WE WERE TOLD ALL OF THIS.

That center acts like a center point for the entire village, or even two or three villages that are in the vicinity. Just gathering, just meeting each other and having a good conversation and some laughs is also like a privilege for these women. When you go to an area the community is first of all, downtrodden, living below poverty line, no idea of rights, no idea of basic things like health, like hygiene, like cleanliness, basic, basic issues. No ideas, no awareness. It's like their only imaginable life is this. They cannot imagine something better for their children because this is all they know. But when you start to talk to them about education, the importance of being literate, the importance of being clean, of having a balanced diet, the importance of looking after the environment, it does change the people that they are. It makes them better.

They actually actively try to make an effort towards these things. I mean the thing is that a lot of people just look at developing countries and they think that, you know, it's just because they're poor and they don't care. But the thing is that they're just not aware, that's the basic problem. When you make them aware, they actually make an active effort in making a change. It really, really makes them feel like they are part of something big. [A man drives a cart pulled by two oxen] It's been a lovely experience to be involved in this project. I just hope that we can raise a lot of awareness for the charities, for the organizations that we're sponsoring for this, because it would be really good to know that we can use our communication medium to raise awareness, and then the charities will be able to sustain themselves in the future going forward. [Women in Pakistani village] [Children's voices] [Boy waves] EMIRATES HELLO TOMORROW WWW.EMIRATES.COM/GREENERTOMORROW

SUPPORTING SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES

Heritage Foundation

Heritage Foundation - Moak Sharif Eco-Village

Heritage Foundation is engaged in a wide range of activities, ranging from the construction of Eco-Villages, sustainable farming practices, building of smokeless cook stoves and educating women and children in these sustainable practices. The funding award will be used to support projects across all three of these areas in the Eco-Village, Moak Sharif.

For more about the Heritage Foundation please visit: heritage.org(Opens link in a new tab)

TRANSFORMING TRANSPORT

The Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities

iCSC works on sustainable energy solutions and fair climate policy. The ejeepney conversion programme shall transform the diesel-fed traditional jeepneys – the Philippines’ most popular means of public transport - into battery-powered electric vehicles. This substantially reduces local air pollution and carbon emissions. Multicabs from Tacloban whose engines were damaged by typhoon Haiyan will be fitted with electric motors, rendering the vehicles as useful public transport vehicles once again.

For more information about the iCSC please visit: ejeepney.org/(Opens link in a new tab)

MANILA: INSTITUTE FOR CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE CITIES

[music playing]

The Ejeepney or the Electric Jeepney is the electric version of the Philippine iconic Jeepney, which is the most common form of public transportation in the Philippines.

REINA GARCIA INSTITUTE FOR CLIMATE & SUSTAINABLE CITIES

So the main difference is that instead of running in an engine, it has an electric motor, and you charge it, and it doesn't emit any pollutants. We have a fleet of 20 Ejeepneys right now, and they are running in Makati city and also in Quezon City.

[traffic noises]

Electric Jeepney has no noise, no smoke, better performance in noise pollution than the ordinary jeep.

ROGELIO NATOR EJEEPNEY TRANSPORT CORPORATION

Right now the jeeps operate in dedicated routes for electric public transports, so they are called the Makati Green Routes, and they are the first routes of their kind in the country.

[traffic noises]

One of the main problems of a highly urbanized city like Makati is that they have a lot of private vehicles, so there's really a need to introduce and to improve on public transports. We recognize that by merely putting more electric vehicles on the road, we don't actually help in solving the traffic problems. Instead of putting a new electric vehicle on the road, we actually take an existing Jeepney, and then we convert it into electric.

The sad thing is that Jeepney drivers are about 50% or more susceptible to air pollution-caused diseases, especially like respiratory diseases, because they are very vulnerable, and they are exposed to air pollutants all day every day.

Driving a taxi we use gasoline or diesel, whereas in the electric Jeepney we only use the electricity.

MA. TERESA CENTENO EJEEPNEY TRANSPORT CORPORATION

We are creating information about the eJeepeney. Everything in eJeepeney we are telling to the passengers. They said, oh, that's great.

The passengers are nice and very cooperative. They like the electric vehicle because they don't hear noise, and they don't inhale the black smoke.

[traffic noises]

I like to ride electric Jeepney because somebody say it's cool, amazing, and they request that more Ejeeps in Makati.

JOSEFINA BARANDON EJEEPNEY TRANSPORT CORPORATION

We've seen that there's really now a momentum being built in introducing more electric vehicles on the road. So we really hope that there will be more electric Jeepneys, and not just Jeepneys, but also electric buses, electric tricycles, and then even improving the whole transport system in the Philippines.

We are very proud of the electric Jeepneys being recognized all over the world.

Electric Jeepneys had no noise, no gas, and it's environmentally friendly. And this is a very special eJeep.

[music playing]

POSITIVE ALTERNATIVES

Ripple Africa

Ripple Africa focuses on environment, education and healthcare in the Nkhata Bay District of Malawi. The Changu Changu Moto stove is a positive alternative to traditional open fires. It is simple, low cost, has a low tech sustainable structure and is sourced 100% from local materials. This stove reduces deforestation in the local area, as well as greatly reducing the direct inhalation of smoke.

For more information about Ripple Africa please visit: rippleafrica.org/

MALAWI: RIPPLE AFRICA [African singing with drums] [Kids sit outside. Women walk down a road. A man and woman talk. A man sits on a tree stump with a boy. School children run. Three kids pump water. Adults socialize. Another group of school children.] [Children singing] Changu Changu Moto. Changu Changu Moto means fast, fast fire.

We called it in our vernacular language, Changu Changu Moto because most of the people whom we came across used to say it cooks fast. And in our own language here Changu Changu means fast fast. [Fire burns in stove made of mud bricks] After doing investigations in the local area, Ripple found that one of the biggest problems was deforestation. And one of the biggest contributors to that is cooking. About 95% of the population use wood for cooking.
 
The Changu Changu Moto uses about a third or a quarter of the amount of wood that people use on the traditional three-stone fire. A three-stone fire, people use these big logs for cooking, and it is dirty in the kitchen. There is ash everywhere. [Logs burn in a 3 stone fire] The charity found some stoves on the internet, and that it was mud bricks, for just a single stove. So from that, we did lots of testing, and we developed the stove. So it evolved into a double stove cook stove. It's a lot safer, because the fire is enclosed, also produces less smoke, smoke-related health issues is actually one of the bigger killers in Africa, not just here, but everywhere that you see traditional three-stone fires.
 
Since most women in Malawi spend a lot of time doing their cooking on three-stone fire, and they had problems with coughs in children also. [Singing] [Forming of mud bricks] You'd see some pretty nasty burns, and you find quite a lot of children have had to go to medical centers because of burns from three-stone fires. We're operating within the whole district, the Nakata Bay district, which has just over 40,000 households. So we're going to build a Changu Changu Moto cook stove in every kitchen for those 40,000 households. We're currently up to about 30,000, so we're getting there, but we hope to, within the next four or five months, we hope to complete the whole district. I would like to see each and every household continuing using the Changu Changu Motos.
 
By so doing, we will save our trees. Saving a lot of wood is very beneficial to trying to slow down deforestation. We want to maintain the beauty of this country. It can be a big benefit for the women in the local area because they're the ones who collect the wood. There's a lot less smoke-related health problems. And really this project is about education. It's about changing the people's habits and get them used to using a new technology.
 
By using a Changu Changu Moto we will totally conserve all our standing trees and it will keep our community green.
[Drums]
[Women shake hands over mud brick stove and smile]
HELLO TOMORROW EMIRATES WWW.EMIRATES.COM/GREENERTOMORROW

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